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HOW TO DO BMX TRICKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Ghetto Endo
Ghetto endo is an odd name, me and my friend made it up. Since we have no breaks we needed a differant way to do this. You need to start biking at a steady pace and when your ready lean forward and jam your right or left foot (whichever is the most comfortable) between the front tube and the fork of the bike and you should do an endo, but watch out you might flip over.

Endo:
This is probably the most basic trick you can do.   Many tricks are started by doing an endo so it is important to know how to do one.
To begin, roll forward standing up with your feet on the pedals.  Lean forward and pull you front brake at the same time.  At this point your back tire should come off the ground.  With you front brake still held, push the handlebars forward as much as possible and lean back a little so you don't flip over.  Balance in that position for a moment until your back tires starts to drop back to the ground.  As the back tire touches the ground again, let go of the front brake and ride away.
Hint:  Make sure your brakes are clean so it doesn't slide when you are learning it.

Elephant Glide:
Elephant glides are very similar to the Funky Chicken with the exception that both legs are over the handlebars instead of just one leg over the bars scuffing the front tire. 

The easiest way to get into the Elephant glide is to do a bar hop.  While rolling in a bar hop position, pull forward on the bars to raise the back end at the same time start scuffing the front tire and shift your weight to one side to get the back end to swing around.  As the back end starts to swing around, continue to scuff the front tire and grab the seat with your right hand when it comes around. Your left hand should remain on the left grip feathering the brake if necessary.  At this point you should be in the Elephant glide position.  Kick as much as you want.  You can go straight or in circles it is up to you.  To ride out you drop the back end and take your right foot and put it on the back right peg.  You will be rolling in a backwards infinity roll at this point.  When you feel comfortable, hit your back breaks to lift the front end up and turn the bars around and jump to the pedals
Elephant glides can be linked to many tricks such as backyards, Back-Packers and more.  It is a very good front end trick to learn because it is used in a lot of front end links which can be learned later.

Elbow Glide:
An Elbow Glide is similar to a Karl Kruzer, only here you are holding your seat with your elbow instead of your hand. 
TO begin, set your right pedal forward.  Stand on the left side of the bike with your right foot on the back peg and your left foot on the front peg.  As you are rolling, slow down and do an endo.  As the back tire comes up, you must put your right foot on the front tire and catch the seat with your upper arm.  You should put your elbow over the top of the seat so the seat is almost under your armpit.  Once you are in this postion you must use your right foot to push the tire backwards.  As you are rolling backwards, keep you right foot extended behind you.  This is the position you will be gliding in. To ride out, simply let the back end drop, put you right foot on the top tube and pedal away.
A good way to get into this trick is to do a Fire Hydrant.  This is the way it is done in the how to video.  To make this trick more difficult, try doing a Forward Elbow Glide.   It is a little harder.

Decade/vertical Boomerang:
This trick is commonly referred to as either the Decade or the Vertical Boomerang.  It looks just like a boomerang, only here the front tire is not on the ground.  The bike is in a vertical position and the rider is doing a Boomerang over the top of the bike. 
To begin, do an Endo with your left foot on the left back peg and your right foot resting on the top tube next to the seatpost.  After the Endo, pull the front end of the bike up with the back brake held.  You will be holding the back brake throughout this trick.  As the front end comes up put all your weight on your right foot and take your left foot off the other peg.  Jump over the head tube by pushing off your seatpost.  Let you left leg go over first.  As you jump over the top, keep your eye on the seatpost.  This is where you will be putting your left foot as you land.  Once you get your foot on the seatpost, the front end will fall to the ground and you will be in position to jump on the pedals and ride away.
Tip:  Once you get good at this trick you can try learning double decades or a Fire Hydrant into a Decade.  If you want to really challenge yourself, try a Rolaid (Rolling Decade).  This is much harder.

Cyclone:
Cyclones are a lot like boomerangs but instead of
jumping around the bike in one motion you ride along
the side of the bike for a few circles before riding
out of the trick.
Start out rolling with both feet on the rear pegs.
Take your right foot and put it on the front left peg.
 Your legs should be crossed in this position.  When
you have a good balance point, shift your weight to
the right and rotate around the bike keeping your
right foot on the front peg and taking your left off
the rear peg.  Try not to use any brakes during this
trick.   When you come around, place your left foot on
the rear right peg.  Your right foot will remain on
the front right peg throughout this trick. Roll in
this postion for as long as you can until you run out
of momentum.  When you feel comfortable to ride away,
simply turn your bars to their normal postion at the
same time taking your right foot off the front peg.
Jump to the pedals and ride away.
Cyclones can be done one handed, no handed and you can
learn to pump the front tire and go in circles
forever.  Cyclones are also a good way to get into
such tricks as Rope-A-Roni's and to gain speed to get
into various front wheel tricks such as Elbow Glides
and Karl Kruzers

Cow Manure:
We wish we could explain the reason they call this a "Cow Manure", but we don't know of anyone that knows.  This is similar to a decade, but you do it with one foot on the peg. 
To do this trick, you can ride into it many different ways.  The easiest way we know of is the do a  Half Lash with your right foot on the left front peg.  As the bike is in front of you in the halflash position, lean forward and put your left foot on the back peg.  Roll in this position.  You are in the same position as when you roll in a Cyclone, only here you are rolling forward.  To do the Cow Manure, pull the back brake and life the front end up.  With your foot still on the front peg,  jump off the back peg with your other foot.  Spin around the head tube with the bike in the vertical position.  You are spinning the opposite way of a typical decade.  To land, keep your foot on the front peg and land with your left leg on the back peg.  As the front end drops to the ground, use your momentum to continue rolling forward and ride away.

Circle K:
The Circle K is named after Kevin Jones who invented the trick.  It is similar to the Side Squeak with the exception that you are scuffing the tire forward in circles instead of backwards and you are kicking the tire with your left foot instead of your right.
Start off by rolling forward with your right foot on the left front peg and your left foot on the rear left peg.  Use your front brake to get your back end off the ground at the same time you want to grab the seat with your right hand to hold the back end up.  While doing these two things you want to start scuffing the front tire with your left foot.  Bring the seat to about waist level and try to keep it pulled toward you.  This will cause you to go in circles at the same time keep the back end in a good balance position.  Scuff in as many circles as you can.  You will need to feather your brakes at first, but after awhile you should be able to this trick without any brakes at all.  One way to ride out of the Circle K is to switch feet on the pegs and put both hands on the grips so that you are in a fork wheelie position.  Then just ride out like a regular fork wheelie.

The Circle K is one of those tricks where you can learn it in a few hours or it may take a few years.  A few ways to get into the Circle K is a Fire Hydrant, Tailwhips or forward Karl Kruzers.

Cherry Picker:
The Cherry Picker is one of the more famous hopping tricks.  It is similar to the modern day "DeathTruck", but here you must hop, not roll.  If you have not yet learned back wheels hops, this trick will be extremely difficult.  We suggest you learn back wheels hops then come back to this. 
Riding into a Cherrypicker can be done several ways.  The easiest ways are from an Lawnmower or a Fire Hydrant with your left pedal set in the forward position.  To do it from a Fire Hydrant, you must land the Fire Hydrant with your foot on the back tire instead of on the top tube.  When you land the Fire Hydrant, your right foot should be on the back tire between the back frame tubes.  Once you are in this position, put all you weight onto the back tire, squeeze your back brake and pull the front end up.  As the front end comes up take your left leg off the front peg and wrap it over the front end of the bike.  The bike should be in a vertical position with you legs wrapped over to top of the bike.  Once in this position, you must begin hopping to maintain your balance.  It helps to take your left hand off the grip and grab the front tire while hopping.  To ride out, stop hopping and reverse the steps you took to get into. 
Tip:  To learn how to hop, it maybe helpful to hold the bike up in the cherrypicker position and climb onto it.  This is a good way to learn the hopping.  Once you learn to hop well, try riding into it and doing the complete trick.  For a slight variation of the Cherry Picker, try taking both hands off while you are hopping.

Burnt Sneaker:
Burnt Sneakers are basically high speed Front Yards but instead of scuffing the tire, you just let your foot glide on top of the tire to keep the backend of your bike in the air and to keep your balance during the trick.  The trick was named for what it does, burns your sneaker.  The soles of your sneakers will wear thin the more you practice this trick hence the name Burnt Sneaker.  The tred of your tires will also wear out the more you practice this trick but it is worth it because it is a cool trick which can be linked to many other tricks.
Start out by rolling at a pretty good speed.  When you are ready, throw your scuffing foot over the bars and place it on the front tire.  Do not put your foot on the tire to hard or you will flip over, just Let it glide ontop of your tire.  This will take practice to learn the right pressure but it is not too difficult.  Do not use any brakes.  Use your foot to balance out and keep the back end up.  The momentum from the speed before the  trick will be enough to keep you going in a Front Yard postion.  You will start to slow down which then you may need to scuff the tire to keep going so that you can ride out.  Once you slow down, simply take your foot that was on the tire and bring it back to your pedals or frame and ride away.

Burnt Sneakers can be done one handed, no handed or into gliding Funky Chickens or linked to other tricks such as Pinky Squeaks, McCircles or Steamrollers. After practicing this trick, your friends will wonder why one sole of your sneaker has no tread on it.  Just tell them it is because of this new trick that you are learning called the Burnt Sneaker.

BarHop:
This trick is useful for riding into other tricks such as an Elephant Glide. 
To begin, roll forward at a medium pace.  With all your weight on the handlebars, jump from your pedals over the handlebars.  Keep your hands on the grips and sit on the handlebars as your continue rolling.  Roll in this position as far as you wish.  To ride out, put one foot on the front pegs and step around the handlebars with your other foot. When stepping around the bars with this foot, take your hand off the grip to get your leg past it.  Once you get your leg past the grip, step on the top tube, stand up and pull your other leg over the top of the handle bars.
Tip:  Once you get over the bars, it may help to roll with your feet off the pegs.  This way you can use your feet to help keep your balance

Bar Endo:
The trick is a modified version to an Endo.  Here you hold the bars with one hand and the bar's are turned 90 degrees.
To begin, do an Endo as you would normally.  As you are at the peak of the Endo, turn your bars counterclockwise 90 degrees.  Keep the front brake held with your left hand, and take your other hand off the grip.    Balance in this position for a second or two.   As you begin to fall back, turn the bars back to the regular position and grab the grip again.  You will land in the same position that you started the Endo.  Ride away.
Tip:  Once you learn this trick, you can try learning  Miami Hop Hop's.  This is  where your remain in the Bar Endo position by hopping on your front tire.

Steamroller:
A Steamroller is similar to a Forwards Fork Wheelie.  If you can't do a Fork Wheelie yet, try learning that first.  It is necessary to do this trick.  This is one of the important forward rolling tricks to learn.  You can use this trick to link to almost all other tricks. 
Start out rolling with your right foot on the back left peg and your left foot on the front left peg.  As you are rolling forward, you must (without brakes) push the bars slightly forward.  Just enough to raise the back tire off the ground. At the same time the back tire rises off the ground, you must push the back end of your bike with your right foot.  This will cause the back end to rotate counterclockwise.  Once the bike rotates 180 degrees, you are in the position to glide the steamroller.  At this point you must grab the seat with your hand.  You can use either hand to grab the set.  Which ever hand is more comfortable.  Glide forward as much as you like.  To ride out of this trick, simply drop the back end of the bike and do a Reverse Smoothie to ride out.
 

Fork Wheelie:
A Fork Wheelie is a fairly simple trick to learn but a very important one to learn.  It teaches you balance to roll on just one wheel which is very important to master before moving onto other rolling tricks.

To start, have your right foot on the rear left peg and your left foot on the front left peg.  Twist your body around the front end of the bike so you do a 180 degree turn.  Kick the tire with one foot to keep the bike rolling forward.  When you feel comfortable pull back on the bars to lift the back end off the ground.  Use one leg as a balance to keep the back end off the ground.  You can also do this trick by holding the seat with one hand to help keep the back end up.  Start out slow and work your way up so that you can coast for as long as you want.  To ride away drop the back end and jump back to the pedals.

Boomerang:
This trick was created in the early 80's.   With this trick, you must ride forward and spin around the front of the bike while holding onto your handlebars.   Once this trick is learned, there are many other variations that can be learned such as the Vertical Boomerang, Double Boomerang,  Perverted Decade, Cyclone and more.

Ride forward at a very slow speed with your feet on the back pegs.  (You can also start from pedals but is a little more difficult.)  Take your right foot and swing it around in back of you.  As you start to rotate in the counterclockwise direction, you take your left foot off the peg.  At this point you have no feet on the pegs and all your weight is on your handlebars.  You must hold yourself up with your arms as you are spinning.  Once you spin the first quarter of the way, you should hold your front brake.  This will keep the bike from rolling.  Use the momentum you get from jumping off your pegs to continue rotating around the front of the bike.  If you jump with enough momentum, it will allow you to spin all the way around the head tube with ease.  Once you complete the full rotation, try putting your left foot on the frame to ride away. (You can also land with your right foot on the right pedal, but this may be a little tougher.)  Once you get your foot on the frame, try to get centered on the bike and jump to the pedals.  Once you get to the pedals you are done.  All you have to do is pedal away.
Hint:  Begin the trick with your right pedal forward.  This makes the trick easier to ride out of.

360 Tailwhip:
The 360 tailwhip gets its name from the frame spinning 360 degrees around the head tube.  This is a good beginner trick. 
To begin, start rolling slowly.  As you are rolling, take your right foot off the pedal and put it on the left side of the top tube.  Both of your feet should be on the left side of the bike and you should be standing on your left peg with your left foot.  Set you pedals so your right pedal is forward.  As you are rolling slowly, pull your front brake, put your right foot on the top of the tire behind the forks and do a small endo.  When the back tire rises off the ground, use your left foot to push the back end of the bike around counterclockwise.  As the frame spins around the head tube, put all your weight on the front tire.  When the frame spins the full 360 degrees put your left foot on the top tube and your right foot on the pedal you set forward.  Pedal Away.
This trick is good for getting into locomotives, backyards and more.  When you get good at this trick you can try doing pinky squeaks.

Back Wheel Hops:
Hopping on one tire is one of the very first freestyle tricks.  Hopping was first done by BMX racers who would get bored in between races.  They would play around with their bikes and learn to balance and hop on their bikes in different ways to keep themselves entertained.  This lead to harder tricks being done and made a lot of racers become freestylers because they found that doing tricks was funner than racing.
To do back Wheel Hops simply stand on the back pegs or pedal and do a little endo to get the front wheel up.  Keep the back brakes on during this whole trick.  Pull up on the front wheel and keep your weight centered over the bike. Shift your weight up. You should start to hop.  Do as many hops as you can until bored.  Stop hopping lean forward and jump to the pedals and ride away.
To do Front Wheels Hops simply start by standing on the pegs or pedals and do a front endo.  Keep the back end up high enough to maintain balance during the hopping.  To start hopping, keep the front brake on and pull up on the handle bars.  You should start to hop.  When the front end comes down, make sure to keep your weight centered and your bars forward as to continue hopping.  Do as many hops as you wish.  To ride away simply drop the back end to the ground and release the brake and ride away.

Hopping can be done on the pegs or the pedals or sometimes standing right on the wheel itself while hopping.  You can take hands off and feet off, turn the bars. Do whatever you feel like doing during hopping. Hopping if anything will teach you the balance necessary to learn harder tricks.

Un Boomerang:
This trick is called an UnBoomerang because you are spinning around the head tube like a Boomerang, only here the bars don't spin.  You must Boomerang around the front of the bike without the bars moving.
To begin, roll forward standing on the left side of the bike with your right pedal forward.  You should have your right foot on the back left peg.  As you are rolling, grab your left grip with your right hand so your hand is upside down.  Grab the right grip with your left hand .  At this point your arms will be crossed.  Once you are in this position, push off the rear peg and spin around the front end of the bike. You must hold yourself up enough with your arms to keep your body from hitting the bars.  To land the trick, put your left leg on the back sprocket side peg.  Put your right foot on the pedal, switch your arms back to their regular position and ride away.
Tip:  You can also do this trick with the bars backwards.  This may make it easier for you to get your body past the bars when spinning.

Ankle Death:
This trick is called an Ankle Death because your ankle can take a beating learning it.  It is just like a whiplash but you never take you left foot off the peg.  Tire burn on your leg is common after attempting this trick.
To do this trick, ride forward at a medium pace just as you would with a whiplash (See Whiplash).  You are going to do everything the same as with the whiplash when starting the trick.  The only difference is in the way which you ride out.  As the bike is rotating in the Whiplash position, keep your right leg off the pegs.  Use it to balance throughout the trick.  As the bike completes the 360 degree revolution, keep your left leg on the peg and drop the back end to roll away.  Continue rolling in this awkward position and you are done.  Climb back onto the pedals which ever way you like. 
Hint:  If you have already learned a whiplash, this trick won't be too hard to learn.  The hard part is riding out of it is doing it without burning your leg on the tire.  Wear shin guards when learning this.

Forward Rope-A-Roni
This trick is the same thing as a regular Rope-A-Roni, but you are rolling forwards.  You body is in the same position as a regular rope, but you get into the trick a different way.  This trick is much harder than a regular Rop-A-Roni.  If you have some basic forward rolling tricks learned at this point, it will make riding into this a little easier.
To begin, set your pedals so the right one is forward.  Start off by rolling forward with you left foot on the back left peg and your right foot on the front left peg.  From this position you must lean forward and do a Half Lash while standing on you right leg.  As you are gliding the Half Lash, lean forward to drop the back end.  As the back tire hits the ground, step on the back peg with your left foot, pull the front end of the bike up, and take your right foot off the front peg.  Use the momentum you have to continue rolling forward.  Use your right leg to maintain balance.  As you are rolling, lean to the right so you begin rolling in a clockwise circle.  Spin in a circle as tight possible.  Once you begin to loose your speed, pull your back brake and drop the front end.  Jump on the pedals and ride away.
Tip:  This trick is hard for many riders to master.  Not only is it difficult to maintain your balance when rolling, but getting into the trick is difficult.  Your timing has to be perfect at the point you jump from the Half Lash to the Forward Rope. 

Backwards Wheelie:
Ride forward at a moderate speed with your feet on the back pegs.  Do an Endo and keep your back brake held.  As you ride out of the endo, your back tire will fall to the ground. At this point, take one of your feet off the pegs and kick the back tire backwards.  Once you begin to kick your tire, release your back brake.  As you roll backwards, use the leg you kicked with to maintain your balance.  Roll as far backwards as you want.  The further the better. To ride out, let your front tire fall back to the ground and hit the brakes to stop rolling.  Once the front tire is back on the ground, jump to the pedals and ride away.
Hint:  If you have trouble balancing as you are rolling back, it may help to feather your back brake.  If you have trouble riding out of the trick, wait until the bike is rolling back at a slow pace before dropping the front tire back to the ground.

Megaspin/BackWheel Spins
Megaspin or backwheel spin is a flashy trick that is fairly simple to learn but it does take awhile to master keep the spin going.  The key is not to use any brakes during the whole trick.
Start off by having both feet on the rear pegs.  When you are ready, swing one leg in the direction you want to spin.  This will give you momentum to start spinning.  As the front end comes up and starts to spin in the direction that you swung your leg, start to kick the tire with the foot you swung to gain momentum as fast as you can without stopping.  Keep your weight centered throughout the whole trick and keep kicking the tire in even, continuous kicks.  Try to hold your handle bars in one position throughout the whole trick.  This will make it easier to keep your balance while kicking the tire.  Keep going as long as you can.  To ride out simply slow your kicking, set the front wheel down and jump back to the pedals from the pegs.

Megaspins can be done one handed by holding the bars in a 90 degree position or they can be done crossfooted or even switchhanded which is called a Jones Wheelie named after the master of flatland himself, Kevin Jones.

Backyard:
The Backyard was one of the first tricks on the back wheel that dealt with scuffing.  It is basically a backwards wheelie with your body facing backward.
The easiest way to start off doing a backyard is to ride your bike backwards with your bars turned around. Ride slow going backwards and pull the front brakes to gain momentum backwards.  As the front tire comes off the ground, start to scuff the back tire with one foot while the other foot stays on the peg.  It helps to wedge the leg that is not scuffing on the side of the seat to help keep the bike vertical.  This also helps in balance to take both hands off the bike.  The foot that is scuffing serves as a brake by slowing and speeding during the backyard so no brakes should be used during this trick.  To ride away slow your scuffing and hit your back brakes.  This will make the front end drop to the ground.  When this happens take your feet off the pegs and jump back to the pedals and ride away while still facing backwards with the bars backward.
The backyard is a very impressive trick that is fairly simple to master.  Variations include spinning in circles, taking hands off and coasting without scuffing.  Many tricks can be linked into and out of backyards so don't limit yourself
 

THIS IS BRANDONS BRANDON SITE OF MUCH EXCITINGNESS AND WITH THE FUN! AND IN CASE OF COLLISION IN THE BIG MOUNTIAN JUST AHAEAD, PUT YOUR SEAT IN THE UPRIGHT POSISTION!